Available findings support the hypothesis that the use of second language as the school language is detrimental to the students. This is because the language undermines the actual purpose of education, where students spends most of their time trying to comprehend what some of the linguistic constructions means rather than conceptualizing the ideas contained there within. Using the first language in set ups where the second language is supposed to be the primary teaching language may enhance the efficiency of the education system. This essay seeks to explore the negative influence of second language in the education system especially student overall performance. The sole intent of education is to build up a holistic student. After going through the education system successfully, it is expected that the resulting person will have qualities which will make him or her whole person with all that he or she requires to tackle life. For instance, the resulting student should be knowledgeable, emotionally and physically healthy, civically inspired, engaged in arts, and prepared for arts and economic self-sufficiency, and ready for the world beyond formal schooling. This can be achieved only by actively engaging the student in the learning process. The success of this form of education is founded on its heavy reliance on culture. Holistic education accepts and appreciates that knowledge is created within the person’s cultural context. Within this context, facts are seldom more than just the shared points of view. Holistic education encourages transfer of knowledge across separate academic disciplines. To achieve the purpose of education, holistic study principles dictate that a person must approach culture with exceptional keenness. The greatest barrier to achieving holistic education is the use of second languages in education. This is because holistic education heavily relies on the culture to achieve its intended purpose However, use of the native language is vital in the maintenance of native culture. It is the native language that carries most of the aspects of a particular culture. Basically, a culture is defined by the language and any attempts to transfer aspects of that particular culture into a new language lose most of the aspects of the culture. It is thereby impossible to integrate the culture into an education system that uses a secondary language. Many education researchers agree that the use of a language that is not dominant in the daily lives of the student’s impacts on their education prospects negatively (Helen, 2007; Irujo, 2004). The report by Helen (2007) further indicates that inappropriate language for instructions can tip the balance into complete exclusion for student facing any barriers in education. In linguistically diverse countries, particularly those with high rural population, it is very sensible to treat school language as one of the most important variables in fostering good quality learning outcomes as well as improving access. Student performance Collier, P. (1989 and 1992) in ‘’How long? A synthesis of research on academic achievement in a second language’’ and ‘’A synthesis of studies examining long-term language minority student data on academic achievement.’’, respectively discusses the difference in academic performance among students who use English as their second language. She notes that use of second language for teaching especially in high schools greatly influences non-native performance since language is better learnt at early stages of development (Collier, 1989 118). In his second article he evaluates academic performance for non- native students and notes that ‘’Overemphasis on second language in teaching leads to poor performance’’ (Collier, 1992 pp. 190). In another article, The influence of second language teaching on undergraduate mathematics performance, a dissertation by Naudé, A., Engelbrecht, J., Harding, A., & Rogan, J. (2004), the author present the influence of second language on students’ performance in mathematics at a south African university. They describe how use of a second language has negative implication the scores of students whom the language of teaching is their second language (pp. 6) Ruiz-de-Velasco, J. (2000) in Overlooked and underserved: Immigrant students in US secondary schools, explains how immigrants find it difficult in schools as they struggle to cope with a secondary language used in curriculum. Ruiz argues that, unlike previous findings, immigrants especially those with schooling gaps are negatively affected by the language used in American schools to teach them (pp. 8) In The Impact of Second Language Acquisition and Student Achievement from Teachers’ Perspectives by Floyd K .T. (2011), Floyd continues to present students who use English as second language being disadvantaged. He notes that while No Child Left Behind Act was meant to improve performance across the board, LEP students continue to suffer. This in turn influences the number of non-native students who graduate from schools. Anxiety Gregersen, T. and Horwitz, E. K. (2002) in Language Learning and Perfectionism: Anxious and Non?Anxious Language Learners’ Reactions to Their Own Oral Performance, illustrates how students react to oral assessment. The writers note that most of the students learning a second language are anxious and therefore tend to perform poorly, since they cannot communicate fluently (pp. 126 – 127). This might also be reflected in their classroom performance. Impact of L2 on NCLB Act Abedi, J. (2004) in ‘’The no child left behind act and English language learners: Assessment and accountability issues’’ describes the inconsistency experienced when evaluating school performance according to the new laws laid down in the No Child Left Behind Act (pp. 4). He notes a significant difference in performance in school with high population of Low English Proficiency (LEP) and their counterpart whose majority are the natives. Schools with many LEP perform dismally compared to other school. In The Impact of Second Language Acquisition and Student Achievement from Teachers’ Perspectives by Floyd K .T. (2011), Floyd continues to present students who use English as second language being disadvantaged. He notes that while No Child Left Behind Act was meant to improve performance across the board, LEP students continue to suffer. This in turn influences the number of non-native students who graduate from schools.

Available findings support the hypothesis that the use of second
language as the school language is detrimental to the students. This is
because the language undermines the actual purpose of education, where
students spends most of their time trying to comprehend what some of
the linguistic constructions means rather than conceptualizing the
ideas contained there within. Using the first language in set ups where
the second language is supposed to be the primary teaching language may
enhance the efficiency of the education system. This essay seeks to
explore the negative influence of second language in the education
system especially student overall performance.
The sole intent of
education is to build up a holistic student. After going through the
education system successfully, it is expected that the resulting person
will have qualities which will make him or her whole person with all
that he or she requires to tackle life. For instance, the resulting
student should be knowledgeable, emotionally and physically healthy,
civically inspired, engaged in arts, and prepared for arts and economic
self-sufficiency, and ready for the world beyond formal schooling. This
can be achieved only by actively engaging the student in the learning
process.
The success of this form of education is founded on its heavy
reliance on culture. Holistic education accepts and appreciates that
knowledge is created within the person’s cultural context. Within this
context, facts are seldom more than just the shared points of view.
Holistic education encourages transfer of knowledge across separate
academic disciplines. To achieve the purpose of education, holistic
study principles dictate that a person must approach culture with
exceptional keenness.
The greatest barrier to achieving holistic
education is the use of second languages in education. This is because
holistic education heavily relies on the culture to achieve its
intended purpose However, use of the native language is vital in the
maintenance of native culture. It is the native language that carries
most of the aspects of a particular culture. Basically, a culture is
defined by the language and any attempts to transfer aspects of that
particular culture into a new language lose most of the aspects of the
culture. It is thereby impossible to integrate the culture into an
education system that uses a secondary language.
Many education
researchers agree that the use of a language that is not dominant in
the daily lives of the student’s impacts on their education prospects
negatively (Helen, 2007; Irujo, 2004). The report by Helen (2007)
further indicates that inappropriate language for instructions can tip
the balance into complete exclusion for student facing any barriers in
education. In linguistically diverse countries, particularly those
with high rural population, it is very sensible to treat school
language as one of the most important variables in fostering good
quality learning outcomes as well as improving access.
Student
performance
Collier, P. (1989 and 1992) in ‘’How long? A synthesis of
research on academic achievement in a second language’’ and ‘’A
synthesis of studies examining long-term language minority student data
on academic achievement.’’, respectively discusses the difference in
academic performance among students who use English as their second
language. She notes that use of second language for teaching especially
in high schools greatly influences non-native performance since
language is better learnt at early stages of development (Collier, 1989

118). In his second article he evaluates academic performance for

non- native students and notes that ‘’Overemphasis on second language
in teaching leads to poor performance’’ (Collier, 1992 pp. 190).
In
another article, The influence of second language teaching on
undergraduate mathematics performance, a dissertation by Naudé, A.,
Engelbrecht, J., Harding, A., & Rogan, J. (2004), the author present
the influence of second language on students’ performance in
mathematics at a south African university. They describe how use of a
second language has negative implication the scores of students whom
the language of teaching is their second language (pp. 6)
Ruiz-de-Velasco, J. (2000) in Overlooked and underserved: Immigrant
students in US secondary schools, explains how immigrants find it
difficult in schools as they struggle to cope with a secondary language
used in curriculum. Ruiz argues that, unlike previous findings,
immigrants especially those with schooling gaps are negatively affected
by the language used in American schools to teach them (pp. 8)
In The
Impact of Second Language Acquisition and Student Achievement from
Teachers’ Perspectives by Floyd K .T. (2011), Floyd continues to
present students who use English as second language being
disadvantaged. He notes that while No Child Left Behind Act was meant
to improve performance across the board, LEP students continue to
suffer. This in turn influences the number of non-native students who
graduate from schools.
Anxiety
Gregersen, T. and Horwitz, E. K.
(2002) in Language Learning and Perfectionism: Anxious and Non?Anxious
Language Learners’ Reactions to Their Own Oral Performance, illustrates
how students react to oral assessment. The writers note that most of
the students learning a second language are anxious and therefore tend
to perform poorly, since they cannot communicate fluently (pp. 126 –
127). This might also be reflected in their classroom performance.
 
Impact of L2 on NCLB Act
Abedi, J. (2004) in ‘’The no child left behind
act and English language learners: Assessment and accountability
issues’’ describes the inconsistency experienced when evaluating school
performance according to the new laws laid down in the No Child Left
Behind Act (pp. 4). He notes a significant difference in performance in
school with high population of Low English Proficiency (LEP) and their
counterpart whose majority are the natives. Schools with many LEP
perform dismally compared to other school.
In The Impact of Second
Language Acquisition and Student Achievement from Teachers’
Perspectives by Floyd K .T. (2011), Floyd continues to present students
who use English as second language being disadvantaged. He notes that
while No Child Left Behind Act was meant to improve performance across
the board, LEP students continue to suffer. This in turn influences the
number of non-native students who graduate from schools.
 
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